Arctic Cat 500 4×4 Specs and Review 2022

Arctic Cat 500 4×4: 1998 saw the introduction of the medium-sized Arctic Cat 500 4×4. 

The vehicle was a boon for the farmer, but not for the more ferocious driver. With its large ground clearance and non-progressive steering, one could say the Cat was a jumble of highly sought-after characteristics for vehicles. 

Arctic Cat 500 4×4

However, because of its faults, it was the Arctic Cat 400 that followed that was able to achieve the perfect balance of being a powerful beast as well as a trail monster.

The Arctic Cat 500 4×4 is designed for utility vehicles that demonstrate strength and efficiency. 

It has a high center of gravity its electronic fuel injection a MultiRack Platform and outstanding capability towing, this 4×4 is the perfect vehicle for those who love to hunt, adventure, and campers.

Don’t let its hunting-oriented appearance fool you, because this four-wheeler is also able to perform in a variety of trails and terrain. 

It only requires skilled hands to steer it in the correct direction. This 4×4 deserves more recognition than it is currently receiving.

About Arctic Cat 500

About Arctic Cat 500 4×4

Arctic Cat 500 4×4 Arctic Cat 500 4×4 is a rec-utility vehicle that was introduced to the market by Arctic Cat (now a subsidiary of Textron Inc.) in the mid-90s. 

It is often misunderstood with the BearCat lineup This 493-cc UTV was part of the mid-size class that competed with big-bore automobiles at the time. 

Some people find this UTV strange due to a few characteristics which are both attractive and detrimental for those who ride. However, all in all, its characteristics are a big hit.

Consumers have the option of an engine-driven trim or 2002 Arctic Cat 500 with its EFI or Electronic Fuel Injection. 

The models came with either a Dramatic automated transmission as well as a 5-speed auto-clutch manual transmission, with a Hi-Lo selection. 

In accordance with the model’s year, trims, and model, drivers can choose a quad with a red, camo, or black finish. 

The add-ons are still available at dealers and online retailers and allow owners to customize their vehicles in accordance with the purpose they’ll be serving.

Each of the Arctic Cat 500 vehicles came in TBX, TRV, M4, and LE trims. They all had dual driveline settings, the Start-In-Gear features hydraulic disc brakes, dual pistons as well as suspension shocks made of coils.

The models that were released prior to 2001 did not come with many options in terms of accessories. This was changed later and made available to 2001 and 2007 models.

2004 Arctic Cat 500 4×4 Specs

  • Engine Power comes from an air/liquid-cooled four-stroke single-cylinder SOHC engine that has an octave-stroke ratio of 87.5 millimeters (3.45 3.23 inches). 3.23 inches). 
  • Its engine displacement measures four93 cubic centimeters. A 36-millimeter Keihin CVK36 carburetor is used to handle an air-fuel mixture. 
  • Tank capacity for fuel will be 24.6 Liters/6.50 US gallons (base/FIS) and 20.8 Liters/5.5 US gallons (TRV) and the reserve of 2.46 Liters/0.65 US gallon reserve. Covers for the engine protect riders’ legs from heat dissipation and reduce engine noise.
  • Drivetrain The vehicle comes with the option of selecting 2WD or 4WD driveline settings. 
  • The power is delivered either through the Dramatic CVT automatic transmission (with EBS Hi/Lo Range, Neutral and reverse) on the model Arctic Cat 500 in 2001 Arctic Cat 500 or a five-speed manual with dual-range and the front locking differential which transmits engine torque to the front wheels via a button for the model of 2004. 
  • In 2005, the Arctic Cat 500 4×4 trim features a front-drive selection switch on the right-hand handlebar, which is similar to its 400-cc counterpart.
  • Ignition This is powered through Electronic CDI ignition, which is paired with an auxiliary pull-starter system as well as an NGK spark plug CR6E. An alternator for flywheels powers electronic accessories. 
  • It requires a 12V, 12AH 200-CCA (Cold Cranking Amps) battery that has dimensions in the range of 6.00 3.44 x 3.44 5.75 5.75 inches (L x W x H). The NOCO Genius G4 6V/12V 4.4 Amp Battery Maintainer and Charger (view at Amazon) can help maintain your battery’s 12V in the top state of repair.
  • Tires Stock tires comprise of Carlisle Badlands 25 x 8-12 front tires and Carlisle Badlands 25 x 11-12 rear tires that are mounted to steel wheels. Aluminum rims were only available in 2005 and 2006.
  • Arctic Cat 500 LE models. The recommended tire pressure for rear and front tires is 0.8-1.0 bar (according to the route and load) for roads and offroad tires. Replace the stock rubber with Maxxis Bighorn Radial tires Tires(view the full list on Amazon) for better handling of the rough terrain better.
  • Brakes Hand-operated, four-wheel hydraulic service brakes that have a lever lock and an additional mechanical parking brake gives you quad brake power.
  • Suspension It’s Arctic Cat 500 features independent double A-arms for the front and rear suspensions with five-way adjustable preload which allow 8.27-inch/21-cm wheels to travel across all four wheels. 
  • The car does not come with Sway bars which is an essential feature for those who are a bit more aggressive and require better handling and turning. 
  • In other words, most riders will notice that the factory setup offers adequate articulation and tire contact.
  •  Twelve inches of clearance improves bump absorption and handling on irregular surfaces.
  • Dimensions The Cat’s total dimensions are 85.8 inches by 48.8 and 50.8 inches (2,180 1240 1290 millimeters – L x W and H) for the FIS models that are base and base models, and 94.1 inches x 48.8 inches 50.8 inches (2,390 1240 1290 mm W x H) for the TRV trim. 
  • The wheelbase of the vehicle has a width of 50.4 as well as 58.3 inches in the TRV version and the base/FIS models and TRV versions, respectively. Dry weight is between 310 and 340 Kg/683.4-749.6 lbs. 
  • This 2-inch hitch for receivers features the capacity of 1,050-lb for towing – it is complemented by a 45-Kg/99.2-lb front rack and a 90-Kg/198.4-lb capacity for the rear rack.
  • Exterior It is comprised of tubular steel frames and the plastic material used for the body. 
  • The models all have elegant bodywork, footrests that are integrated, and 100-lb storage under the seat (with batteries) and storage beneath the handlebars. 
  • The tank for fuel is located on the front. 
  • The side panel hides the pull-start system that is an auxiliary feature. In the middle console, between the handlebars, you’ll discover the digital display. 
  • The two 35-watt Halogen headlights give the quad with superior lighting distribution.
  • MultiRack Platform (MRP) The MRP is a unique accessory system, which is referred to as SpeedRacks connects to the quad’s rear and front fenders.
  • The receiver-rack design is able to accept many options from the Arctic Cat exclusive accessory attachments to help haul and store equipment securely.

Arctic Cat 500 Price

The cost of the Arctic Cat 500 is between $6,300 and $11,000, based on the year and trim, transmission type, and package features. 

The TBX models include dump beds TRVs are two-up cars as well as LE Hunter’s Edition trims come with additional features to hunter’s equipment, making them more expensive than others.

I compiled information from Nada Guides to help you make a reference (please be aware that these figures only apply to ’01-’07 models):

Arctic Cat 500 Prices
Model Year Transmission – Trim
LE – Limited Edition
MRP – MultiRack Platform
Price Range
2001 4WD Manual – LE (Hunter) MSRP: $6,749
Average Retail: $1,350
2001 4WD Automatic – LE (Hunter) MSRP: $6,999
Average Retail: $1,385
2001 – 2007 4WD Manual MSRP: $6,349 – $6,499
Average Retail: $1,375 – $2,070
2001 – 2007 4WD Automatic MSRP: $6,599 – $6,699
Average Retail: $1,360 – $2,100
2002 4WD Manual EFI MSRP: $6,599
Average Retail: $1,430
2002 4WD Automatic EFI MSRP: $6,799
Average Retail: $1,490
2002 – 2006 4WD Automatic – TBX MSRP: $6,999- $7,149
Average Retail: $1,485 – $1,970
2003 – 2004 4WD Automatic – MRP MSRP: $6,749 – $6,949
Average Retail: $1,515 – $1,605
2004 4WD Manual – MRP MSRP: $6,549
Average Retail: 1,545
2004 – 2006 4WD Automatic – TRV MSRP: $7,399 – $7,599
Average Retail: $1,705 – $2,230
2005 – 2006 4WD Automatic – LE MSRP: $7,449 – $7,549
Average Retail: $1,600 – $2,170
2006 4WD Automatic – M4 MSRP: $7,249
Average Retail: $1,995

2005-2006 Arctic Cat 500 4×4 Limited Edition

It’s Arctic Cat 500 Limited Edition trims offered a number of functional and aesthetic enhancements when in comparison to the standard version.

 The car’s features were more appealing for riding recreationally and for regular outdoor activities. Here are a few of the notable improvements the four-wheeler could boast of:

  • The options for transmissions have been expanded to include an automated CVT shaft drive as well as Electronic Fuel Injection.
  • Standard tires were changed between Carlisle Badlands to Goodyear Rawhide RS on all Arctic Cats to increase traction, steering control, and long-lasting.
  • Brakes have been modernized to use hydraulic discs both rear and front, and a new suspension system.
  • 2005-2006 LE trims featured body-matching paint wheels. The wheel’s composition changed from aluminum to machined steel.
  • LE models came standard with a heavy bullbar as well as A-arm guards (optional for the base model, and with other trims).
  • Hunter’s LE models came with a warn winch (view the video on Amazon) and gun scabbards as well as Advantage camo covers made from urethane-coated polyester, and back-mounted cargo bags with eight-point attachment straps.
  • The upgraded instrumentation includes the clock/hour meter as well as 13 other crucial operating indicators.
  • The close proximity of the winch mount and winch solenoid made it easier to speed up winch wiring.

In spite of the upgrades made in the article, the LE trims were not the ideal off-road vehicle. 

One issue was that the driveline lever, situated on the left side on side of the tank for fuel, was too low and uncomfortable to use. 

This was an enormous disappointment for the riders since this issue was carried on into the model with a 400cc engine which was introduced in 2003. 

The suspension geometry of this quad was still a bit off which was corrected only by the TRV cousin. 

The overlying cover for the transmission case strained the foot brake and gave the users with limited space for their feet with the scabbard in place.

Arctic Cat 500 Known Issues

Like all quads as well, like all quads, Cat is not without its flaws. There are a few bumps in and out however, there is nothing complicated that can’t be fixed. 

Certain of them were completely resolved with time (especially when the trims were updated in recent years) However, some appear to have been transferred to newer models. 

Some owners experience the problems below in the case of secondhand purchases. If you’re in process of purchasing a secondhand Cat It is important to be aware of the following Arctic Cat 500 ATV problems prior to purchase:

Faulty Actuator

The actuator’s issues seem to be common across the mid-size Arctic Cat models. It is not uncommon for it to cause people who aren’t tech-savvy Cat owners in a state of confusion. 

For experienced mechanics, identifying the problem (actuator or electrical) is only half the way to solving the issue.

Naturally, you’ll be required to read your manual for the owner and perform fundamental tests of the fuse and power supply, ignition, and switch. 

If these tests show nothing amiss with each of these components only then will it be considered to be safe to say the actuator is damaged and requires replacement?

Bogs Down on Rough Terrain

This problem is quite common particularly for those who are riding at 8,000 to 10,000 feet altitudes. 

If you’re one of those who are out on the open, you could be noticing that your 4×4 slows down badly and is unable to keep 18 mph speed on roads that are gravel.

Cleaning the carburetor, jetting your air filters, examining compression, and testing the choke are a few ways you can do to get rid of the issue. 

If none of these work it is necessary to make the Arctic Cat 500 carburetor adjustment that will ultimately resolve the issue.

Carburetor Problems

Certain Cat owners report problems when cranking, but they find that the quad isn’t running out of fuel and the fuel lines aren’t blocked after inspection. 

It is interesting to note that Arctic Cat Prowler 500 models also suffer from this issue. If this happens to you be sure to take these things:

  • The carburetor must be removed and disassembled completely, then thoroughly cleaned.
  • Make sure that the float bowl is in good working order and there aren’t any vent hoses that have been crimped.
  • Make sure the drain for overflow on the carburetor’s intake is not blocked
  • Cleaning your air filter in order to prevent the engine from running overly rich.
  • Be aware not to over-lock the piston when the fuel is compressed beyond it

Once you’ve completed these first steps, it is possible to run the compression test before looking into the root of what’s causing the issue. 

This will allow you to avoid complicated, but unnecessary procedures like cutting the top of the cylinder off even if it’s not needed.

 Another method is changing the oil (note the amount of oil added) and then drain it into a clear container, and then observing whether gas is floating on top (then determine the amount of gas afterward). 

If there is no gas-oil separation, it is possible to determine if fuel contamination is the reason. Once you have fixed the problem you should remove the float bowl of your carburetor to avoid repeat offenders.

2005-2006 Arctic Cat 500 4×4 Limited Edition

It’s Arctic Cat 500 Limited Edition trims featured a variety of functional and aesthetic enhancements when in comparison to the standard version. 

The characteristics of the vehicle make it ideal for leisure riding and for regular outdoor activities. Here are some of the best features the four-wheeler offered:

  • The options for transmission have been are now expanded to include an automatic CVT shaft drive, as well as electronic Fuel Injection.
  • The stock tires were upgraded between Carlisle Badlands to Goodyear Rawhide RS on all Arctic Cats to improve traction, steering control, and endurance.
  • Brakes have been modernized to use hydraulic discs both front and rear brakes and complemented by a new suspension system.
  • 2005-2006 LE trims featured body-matching paint wheels. The wheel’s composition changed from aluminum to machined steel.
  • LE models came with a heavy bullbar as well as A-arm guards (optional in the base model and additional trims).
  • Hunter’s LE models came with a Winch Warn (view at Amazon) as well as a gun scabbard and Advantage camo covers constructed of urethane-coated nylon, and the rear-mounted cargo bag that has eight-point attachment straps.
  • New instrumentation was added, including an hour/clock meter, as well as 13 other crucial operating indicators.
  • The close proximity of the integrated winch mounting and winch solenoid made it easier to speed up winch wiring.

In spite of the upgrades that were mentioned in the article, the LE trims weren’t the ideal off-road vehicle. 

One issue was that the lever for the driveline, which was located on the left side of the fuel tank was a bit low and uncomfortable. 

This issue was a major surprise for riders as this issue was also carried over on the model with a 400cc engine that was launched in 2003. 

The suspension geometry of this quad was still a bit off which was corrected only by the TRV sister. 

The high-profile transmission case cover strained the foot brake and gave the users with limited space for their feet with the scabbard in place.

Arctic Cat 500 Known Issues

Like all quads like any other quad, as with any quad, the Cat is not without its flaws. There are a few bumps occasionally however, there is nothing complicated that can’t be fixed. 

Certain of them were completely resolved in the course of time (especially due to recent trims) However, some appear to have been passed on to newer models.

Some owners experience the problems below when purchasing second-hand. If you’re in the process of purchasing a secondhand Cat It is important to be aware of the following Arctic Cat 500 ATV problems before you buy:

Faulty Actuator

The actuator’s issues seem to be common across the mid-sized Arctic Cat models. They always cause people who are not tech-savvy Cat owners in a state of confusion. 

However, for skilled mechanics, identifying the problem (actuator and electrical) is already half solving the issue. 

Naturally, you’ll have to consult the owner’s manual as well as perform basic tests on the fuse and power supply, ignition, and switch. 

When these tests are conclusive and show no sign of anything problem with one of these parts the only thing you need to do is be safe to conclude it is the case that the actuator has become not working properly and will require replacement.

Bogs Down on Rough Terrain

This is a common problem and is most prevalent for drivers who are riding at 8,000 to 10,000-foot heights. 

If you’re one of the adventurers, you might be noticing that your 4×4 slows down severely and is unable to keep 18 mph speed on roads with gravel.

Cleaning the carburetor, jetting your air filters, testing the compression, and testing the choke are a few options you can do to get rid of the issue. 

If none of these work then you’ll need to carry out the Arctic Cat 500 carburetor adjustment that will ultimately resolve the issue.

Carburetor Problems

Certain Cat owners have reported problems when cranking, but they find that the quad isn’t depleted of fuel and fuel lines aren’t blocked when they check.

 It is interesting to note that Arctic Cat Prowler 500 models also suffer from this issue. If this happens to you be sure to take these things:

  • The carburetor must be removed and disassembled completely, then thoroughly cleaned.
  • Make sure that the float bowl is in good working order and there aren’t any vent hoses with crimped crimps
  • Check that the drain for the overflow of the carburetor does not block
  • Cleaning your air filter in order to prevent the engine from running overly rich.
  • Be cautious not to over-lock the piston in the event that excess fuel expands over it

After you’ve completed the initial steps, you might want to conduct the compression test first before looking into the root of what’s causing the problem.

This will allow you to avoid complicated, but unnecessary procedures like cutting the top of the cylinder off even if it’s not needed. 

Another option involves changing the oil (note the amount of oil added) and then emptying it into a clear container, and seeing whether gas appears to float over it (then determine the amount of gas following this). 

If there is no gas-oil separation, you are able to eliminate fuel contamination as the reason. Once you’ve fixed the issue regularly empty the carburetor’s float bowl to avoid repeat offenders.

Arctic Cat

About Textron

Textron Inc., an industrial company based in Rhode Island widely known for its snowmobiles as well as all-terrain vehicles, is the producer of the Arctic Cat 500 4×4. The American company is the parent company for Arctic Cat Inc.,

Cushman industrial vehicles, Cessna aircraft, Bell helicopters, EZ-GO, TUG, McDonald Douglas, Bad Boy Buggies, and Greenlee tools. 

The constant effort of Textron to expand its product lineup is what earned the company a place in the Fortune 500 companies. 

Presently, its products include gasoline-electric hybrid-powered off-road vehicles. Some of them are those from the Prowler, Stampede, Havoc, Wildcat, and Alterra range that comprise SxS as well as ATVs.

Conclusion – Arctic Cat 500 4×4

The flaws which were a part of the Arctic Cat 500 had in its first years of production paved the way for the mechanical improvements which were made apparent in the year 2010 and subsequent models. 

Today, the Cat’s features work perfectly. Its lower center of gravity, long-travel suspension, 2WD/4WD mode with differential lock, and revamped seat design have helped improve the quad’s cornering ability and steering response.

If you own an older model year, it is not unusual. You can count on a reliable and nifty off-road vehicle designed for hard work and play. With the proper amount of maintenance and care and proper maintenance, the Arctic Cat 500 guarantees to give you a new feeling of freedom every time you drive.

Is the Arctic Cat 500 a good ATV?

The Arctic Cat 500 4×4 is designed to be a utility vehicle that oozes power and performance. Thanks to its gigantic center of gravity, its electronic fuel injection, as well as the MultiRack Platform and outstanding capability tow, this 4×4 is the ideal vehicle for those who love to hunt, adventure as well as campers.

Are Arctic Cat 4 Wheelers any good?

Arctic Cat vehicles are also recognized for offering all the strength and performance of more expensive competitors at a lower price. The most well-known Arctic Cat model is the Alterra 300. Due to its stable suspension and low mass, it’s an excellent ATV for younger or novice drivers.

Does Arctic Cat still make 4 wheelers?

In 2017 Arctic Cat produced its final model year of ATVs following the company’s acquisition by Textron, along with Alterra remaining as a Textron Off Road brand name. It is expected that the Arctic Cat brand will return to side-by-side models in the year 2019 for 2020 model year vehicles.

Are Arctic Cat Alterra any good?

The suspension’s travel is extremely long in comparison to the direct competition. With 10 inches of movement, I have to affirm that the Alterra is adept at tackling holes. The Alterra is well-padded and provides great stability on the trails. With an 11-inch ground clearance, The ATV is tall enough to keep clear of any obstacles.

Common Questions

1. What type of fuel is recommended to run an Arctic Cat 500?

It is recommended to use unleaded gasoline that has a research Octane value of 91 or greater. 24.6 Liters/6.50 US gallons (base/FIS) or 20.8 Liters/5.5 US gallons (TRV) of fuel ought to suffice to fill your tank. Beware of fuel variants with higher than 10 percent ethanol or 5% Methanol to prevent damage to the piston rings, valves, and exhaust systems.

2. What type of oil will The Arctic Cat 500 take? 

The Arctic Cat 500 requires 2.64 quarts/2.5 Liters of engine oil. Recommended engine oils are it is SAE 10W-40 lube that has at the very least the API class of service of SG, or better in addition to the JASO MA’s standard. For final and differential gear oil suggestions, the manufacturer recommends 250 mL or 275 milliliters of SAE-approved hypoid lubricant 80W-90.

3. What years did they make the Arctic Cat DVX 400?

Arctic Cat has been building quads since 1995, however, it was only after nearly 10 years the company intended to enter the market for sport ATVs and launched in 2004 the DVX400 and the model 650 4X4.

4. Does Suzuki make Arctic Cat?

Suzuki has been supplying engines to Arctic Cat since 1976. It became a major shareholder in June 1988 when it paid $12.8 million for 33 percent of the company. It was then named Arctco. … Arctic Cat and Polaris are among the leading four power sports.

5. What engine is in Arctic Cat ATV?

Arctic Cat’s Alterra 450 packs a punch thanks to its powerful 443cc single Cylinder with a Liquid Cooled EFI engine.

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