Kawasaki KFX 700 Specs and Review 2022

Kawasaki KFX 700: In the case of Honda, whose King of the Hill is the 700xx for Kawasaki it’s KFX 700. KFX 700. 

Also called”the V Force or simply “V,” this 697-cm3 V-Twin-powered quad is a blended part of Brute Force’s and Prairie line of products and blends the most sought-after features into one legendary four-wheeler.

Kawasaki KFX 700

With the lime green exterior panels and racing-inspired front frame as well as 22-inch tires, this seems like the biggest beast. It also earned the name The Monster Truck in the Quad World.

The most coveted Team Green four-wheeler known as the Kawasaki KFX700 is among the first quads manufactured in mass production that boasts a powerful powerband, V-Twin engine, and a front differential with a limited-slip. 

It is designed for wooded and dunes trails This dual-purpose quad is popular among cross-country racers.

Its KFX 700 was created with Kawasaki’s formula for success – an engine that is powerful with a racing-style chassis as well as an automatic belt-driven transmission. These features do not only are the primary selling points, but it also reflects their aggressive attitude.

Kawasaki KFX 700

In reality, indeed, the Kawasaki KFX 700 is proof that mixing old-fashioned ideas can lead to innovative off-road vehicles, as you’ll see within this post.

The Team Green’s Monster Truck

It is the Kawasaki KFX 700 is known by many different names, including “point and click” bike green hornet “V” and many more. 

My personal preference is the description below. It’s perfect for this huge powerful machine, which can compete with race-ready 400-/450-class quads and big bore four-wheelers with fuel injection.

In 2003, the KFX 700 hit the ground and ran with its practical features and impressive capabilities. It had a six-year production time across the US and was available to 2011 in Europe.

While initially advertised as a sport quad that was pure, however, the wheeler was a better fit for the more of a utility-sports category. 

This is mainly due to its utility-focused origins, which were influenced by the general design and function that was those of the Prairie as well as Brute Force ATVs. 

In spite of its niche, it was KFX 700 was a popular model. KFX 700 soon joined the ranks of its highly-acclaimed predecessors.

Trail Machine

This KFX 700 mostly feels at its best in open spaces, however, it is also able to perform well when riding on narrow trails. Its CVT transmission reveals the power of the motor and keeps the riders in the powerband.

Its steering is extremely effortless and light, which contributes to the heavyweight’s ability to maneuver on slow-moving sections and dirt surfaces. 

In comparison with the Brute Force, this KFX 700 offers a firmer out-saddle riding experience and less body roll due to its dual A-Arm front suspension.

This beast is fantastic to race in drag, it’s not suitable for tracks with MX because of its weight. 

An experienced rider will be able to manage the huge 4×4, but the design of the vehicle is designed to be an off-road machine.

You can put wide-spaced rollers as well as other upgrades to the quad however they will not render it invulnerable to damage should it is rolled or whoops become too deep. 

However, it is a great choice for riders who want to be protected. KFX700 is a powerful torque machine and is a great choice for riders who have had enough of shifting.

Benefits and Pitfalls

Advantages and Pitfalls

Is Kawasaki KFX 700 is indeed well-balanced and was instantly loved by the public upon its debut on the market. 

It was acknowledged as the closest thing you can get to the perfect trail quad and was able to hold this distinction for three years following its release.

However, due to recent ATV advancements (and also the reality that many KFX 700s are used) The design, as well as the condition, could no longer be in the category of being near-perfect. 

Therefore, it is recommended to learn the advantages and disadvantages of this legendary machine, especially if you’re thinking about purchasing one of these:

Pros:

  • The front brakes provide an outstanding feel, whereas the rear brakes feel somewhat less solid when you pull the lever. They can also be barely noticeable. The rear brake, however, is multi-disc and is able to compensate for the insufficient feel by providing power and endurance.
  • A rear brake with an internal mechanism and stock 22-inch tires and the ring-and-pinion configuration permits more clearance on the ground.
  • The KFX 700’s middle section is slightly shorter than its big-bore equivalents. Most riders will find this ultra-long saddle to be comfortable.
  • The handlebar bend is comfortable and the alignment between the handlebars, seat, and footpegs make for an enjoyable long ride.
  • V Force V Force offers additional ground clearance over chain drives that is beneficial when it is time to rough down the quad.
  • A small percentage of 2WD vehicles get off-roaders where they need to go, as long as the intention is not to build wings on the vehicle to glide through the woods.
  • In terms of acceleration, it may slow down its competitors for a while, but eventually, pass by.

Cons:

  • Many enthusiasts would prefer an engine-braking system that could stop the four-wheeler, without triggering the throttle. 
  • This option would be beneficial for new riders who may have difficulty engaging the gas when riding down steep descents.
  • Although it was advertised as a pure-sport quad certain riders feel it is too heavy for their sport. In addition, it emits a lazy impression of handling because of its size and weight.
  • Plastics that are commonly used (especially those with special editions) are too fragile and can break if you make a mistake and without damaging the 4×4.
  • There is no digital dash gauge is a major issue, forcing owners to purchase parts from the aftermarket Kawasaki KFX 700 parts to make up the gap.
  • Riders believe that the car’s low-end torque and strength could be more effectively used if the vehicle included racks, storage, or racks built into the space.
  • The top-end speed isn’t the most efficient in its class. Because the quad is totally automated, it is able to lose gears in comparison to manual-tranny four-wheelers, which can run at 5th and 6th gears.

In general, typically, Kawasaki KFX 700 does the job very well if it’s you are focusing on the intended usage. 

It’s a great option for those who prefer leisurely riding, riding on beaches and roads that are blazes, and even drag racing. 

If you’re returning from an older, more compact pure-sport quad, then you may consider this model unusual.

Kawasaki KFX 700 Specs and Features Engine

The Kawasaki KFX 700 borrowed its V-Twin power mill as well as its back-end shaft drives from the Brute Force lineup, confusing people who ride it into thinking the vehicle is fuel-injected. But it’s not.

The Keihin CVKR 32 downdraft carburetors are sufficient to allow it to be fuel-efficient. However, if you want to make the most offered by KFX 700 engine, you can do so. KFX 700 engine, you could always tweak it for EFI.

Engine Type 4-Stroke SOHC
Cylinder Arrangement V-Twin, 90° cylinder offset
Carburetion System Carburetor, Keihin CVKR–D32 x 2
Engine Cooling Liquid cooling
Fuel Capacity 12 L/3.2 US gal
Bore x Stroke Ratio 3.23 × 2.6 in
Compression Ratio 9.9:1
Starting System Electric
Displacement 697 cm³ / 42.5 in³
Maximum Power 48.7 hp/49.4 PS (36.3 kW) @ 6,500 RPM
Maximum Torque 59.2 Nm (6.04 kgf-m, 43.67 ft-lb) @ 5,000 RPM
Top Speed 76.4 mph (123 km/h) – owners’ claim
Air Filtration High-quality foam element
Engine Oil & Quantity 1.8 US quarts w/ filter; 2 US quarts w/out filter
2.3 US quarts at disassembly
SAE 10W-40 w/ API grade of SJ meeting JASO T903 MA
SAE 5W-30, 10W-30, 10W-50, 15W-40, 15W-50, 20W-50 – depending on ambient temperature

Drivetrain

A mono-speed automated KAPS (Kawasaki Automatic Powerdrive System) CVT transmission, with reverse that handles shifting. The auto-transmission-and-V-Twin-engine combo eliminates RPM and shifting concerns, giving riders maximum powerband and allowing them to choose good lines every time they ride.

To counteract the absence of bounce the well-managed chassis is narrowed down to one spar in the front. Additionally, it is fitted with a Kevlar drive belt that boosts its acceleration.

Clutch Wet, multi-plate type
Transmission Type 1-speed and reverse
Drive System (Cardan) Shaft 2WD, (Kevlar) Belt drive torque converter
Primary Ratio 3.122 – 0.635
Final Drive Ratio 4.375 (35/8)
Transmission Gear Ratio Forward – 2.416 (29/27 × 27/20 × 20/12)
Reverse – 4.285 (16/12 × 20/14 × 27/20 × 20/12)

Ignition

A KAC (Kawasaki Automatic Compression Release) that is paired with an electric start system, makes the process of starting the four-wheeler easy.

The three-phase A.C. generator offers fast, easy power to electronic devices.

It is KFX 700 uses a YTX14-BS battery that is rechargeable, leak-proof, and also vibration-resistant.

Ignition Digital DC-CDI (Capacitor Discharge Ignition), electronically advanced
Ignition Timing 5° BTDC @ 1,100 RPM to 28° BTDC @ 5,000 RPM
Spark Plug, Gap NGK CR7E, DENSO U22ESR-N, gap (0.7-0.8 mm, 0.028-0.031 in)
Alternator Type Triple-phase A.C. generator
Rated Output 25 A, 14V @ 6,000 RPM
Fuse 30 Amp
Battery 12V (14 Ah), YTX14-BS formats (view on Amazon)
Battery Dimensions (L x W x H) 150 x 87 x 145 mm (6 x 3.44 x 5.75 in)

Brakes & Tires

Dual front disc brakes hydraulic with dual-piston calipers, enclosed oil-bathed disc rear disc brakes, as well as sticky knobbies that are tubeless, give this machine stopping power. 

The stock rubber was later replaced with the same size that had been tested with GNCC ITP(r) Holeshot(r) tires that fit on the model year 2006.

The recommended for tire inflation is four psi/5psi (front/rear) but it can be adjusted in accordance with the terrain, the rider’s weight, and the style of riding. Be careful not to overdo it since excessive pressure can cause a rough ride and cause traction problems.

Front Rim Size 10 x 5.5
Rear Rim Size 10 x 8.5
Front Tire, off-road/road air pressure Tubeless, Carlisle Holeshot XC AT22 x 7-10, 27.58 kPa (0.28 kgf/cm2, 4 psi)
Rear Tire, off-road/road air pressure Tubeless, Carlisle Holeshot XCT AT22 x 11-10, 34.57 kPa (0.35 kgf/cm2, 5 psi)
Front Brake Type Dual hydraulic discs w/ twin-piston calipers
Rear Brake Type Enclosed wet multi-plate

Suspension

Even though it borrowed its motor and various parts from Brute Force, the company that made it. Brute Force company, it was the KFX 700 underwent several changes to enhance its sporting performance.

These included a completely new chassis and dual A-arms instead of Brute Force’s McPherson struts (view on Amazon). 

The wide, long arm angle gives great handling, cutting down on tire wear during up-and-down suspension travel.

Frame Type High-tensile tubular steel, double-cradle
Caster, Trail 4.5°, 20 mm (0.79 in)
Turning Radius 3.2 m (10.5 ft)
Front Suspension Type, Travel Double A-arms w/ coil-over shocks (5-way adjustable preload), 236 mm (9.29 in)
Rear Suspension Type, Travel Linkless swingarm w/ piggyback reservoir shocks (spring preload, rebound & compression damping adjustable), 200 mm (7.87 in)

Dimensions

Despite having a larger capacity, the KFX 700 is slightly smaller in overall dimensions in comparison to Brute Force 650. Brute Force 650. 

It also has an adequate level of clearance that is ideal for trail riding and driving through bumpy and rough terrain. 

For taller riders, there’s no issue handling the car’s 516-pound dry weight. However, smaller off-roaders may have a problem.

Exterior

Team Green’s King of the Hill is a stunning design. Its rugged style and saw-toothed footpegs give riders all-out flexibility and control.

Footrests with footrests are a nice addition for long trails. As with the other Kawasaki ATVs however, it is not as good in terms of instruments. Fortunately, buying a Trail Tech 752-118 Black Vapor Digital Gauge Kit (view on Amazon) as an upgrade will solve the issue.

Indicator Lamps Standard
Fuel Gauge Standard
Engine Stop Switch Standard
Headlight Semi-sealed beam, 12V 45W/45W x 2
Brake Light/Taillight 12V 21W/5W
Indicator Lights (neutral, reverse, fuel, water temp, belt indicator, oil pressure warning lights)
Colors Lime Green, Metallic Marble Red, Blazing Orange, Black, Camouflage, Black Marble, Meteor Blue (E-03 USA; E-28 Canada; E-33 California)

The cost of the Kawasaki KFX 700

Here’s a table that displays the MSRP and the retail prices of the Kawasaki KFX 700 models manufactured from 2004 to 2009 Auction listings with no aftermarket upgrades will be similar to the trade-in prices listed below.

To enhance certain mechanical parts that make up your quad to eliminate the most common problems, and ensure it is race-ready You may have to invest an additional between $2,000 and $5,000.

Year – Trim – Model Number List Price Retail/Trade-In Values
2004 Kawasaki KFX 700 KSV700A1 $6,499 $1,260 – $2,640
2005 Kawasaki KSV700A2 $6,499 $1,440 – $2,835
2005 Kawasaki KSV700B2, IG $6,799 $1,530 – $2,010
2006 Kawasaki KSV700A6F $6,499 $1,600 – $3,030
2006 Kawasaki KSV700B6F, IG $6,799 $2,075 – $3,055
2006 Kawasaki KSV700C Camouflage N/A $2,055 – $3,030
2007 Kawasaki KFX 700 KSV700A7F $6,499 $1,840 – $3,220
2007 Kawasaki KSV700B7F $6,799 $1,840 – $3,220
2008 Kawasaki KSV700A8F $6,499 $2,065 – $3,415
2008 Kawasaki KSV700B8F $6,799 $2,065 – $3,415
2009 Kawasaki KSV700A9F $6,849 $2,620 – $3,595
2009 Kawasaki KSV700B9F $7,149 $2,620 – $3,595

Common Problems of the KFX700

Common Problems of the KFX700

One of the disadvantages of a borrowed engine and rear-end arrangement is the fact that the four-wheeler faces similar issues in the model. Similar to Kawasaki’s KFX 700

Let’s look at the vehicle’s most frequent problems and see if we can determine which are taken over by previous models of the Prairie as well as the Brute Force lineup:

Fragile Tie Rods

The tie rods that come with the vehicle are as smooth as butter and are only fixable by using aftermarket tie rods as well as tie rod end. 

But be cautious about using aftermarket tie rods that could affect the frame of the vehicle particularly the area around where the front spar is (the small mount in the front, of the lower mount that is bolted).

Just replacing the parts that are flimsy and strengthening the frame’s frame’s frame’s frame won’t offer a long-term solution when you aren’t careful about striking large rocks, trees, or other obstacles with speed. 

Avoid excessive lift kits or larger tires because they make the tie rods of the stock weaker.

2004 Rocker Arm Shafts

Mounting bolts for the shafts of the rocker arm on KFX models in 2004 700 models are prone to become loose and slide into the motor’s top end, which can cause catastrophic damage.

To prevent this from happening, be sure that you grease the shaft and the rocker arm only after putting them in their final position. That means you should put these components in place dry.

Also, you may have to differ from the manufacturer’s torque specifications in order to install brand-new crank towers or rocker shafts, not a common occasion. 

If the recommended rocker shaft’s torque was 1.8 km/min (13 ft-lb) it is possible that you will require a boost to 2.5 over 2.8 km/min (18.07-20.24 ft-lb) for used rocker assemblies to make sure they don’t break.

If you are buying a secondhand item the best method to test it is to remove off the valve cover for inspection of lash and check the bolts that are 8mm absent.

Problems with cold-starting

The challenges of cold-starting aren’t unique to KFX 700. Similar to the Prairie 650, its monstrous V-Twin engine is equipped with a unique feature during cold temperatures that slow down the quad’s ignition, which results in a problem with the engine’s startup.

Furthermore, the rear end is completely locked during long durations. As if that wasn’t enough, other reasons like the presence of moisture within the cable for brakes, water-polluted oils inside the diff, the wrong fluid, and even water inside the housing in the rear (around the lever of the brake) are all contributing to the issue.

The best part is that it’s among the less difficult issues related to the quad. getting rid of any moisture or improper fluid from the system of the vehicle can fix it.

Drive Pulley Problems

Most often, this issue occurs when you submerge your 4×4 beyond the fording point without waterproofing the wheel first.

The splines are eroded and the drive pulley damage on the cage’s surface because of worn-down plastic buttons could also be the cause. 

Signs of misfiring include slippage, leaks of oil, or engine noise, which gradually increases to the sound of grinding over time.

Lubricating damaged parts does not just reduce wear but also assists in solving the issue. 

On the other hand, wear marks cannot be repaired and suggest the need for a replacement spider that will cost approximately $90.

Available Parts

Based on KFX owners that tires and CV boot, the steering stem, and the taillight are among the parts in the stock that require urgent replacement because they’re brittle. 

The first two are vulnerable to wobbling or vibrating when at high speeds. The taillight is prone to failure even if you don’t wheel too much.

Premature Wear

It’s the same for other parts which will wear out too quickly for instance intake valves as well as front bumper mounts as well as swingarm bearings. 

Front bumper mounts aren’t able to support anything more robust than the OEM bumper, or else they could break or crack in the event of a single small hit.

For swingarm bearings, they are not properly sealed at the time of manufacture. Additional weight added by the brake system sealed frequent mud-riding further aggravates their fragility. 

Cleaning them regularly and replacing worn-out components as required resolves the issue.

Other Issues

  • The suspension in the stock is too rigid.
  • The steering hoop can bend easily when the four-wheeler is rolling.
  • Shifter continues to knock out of gear, even after correct adjustments.
  • Making the valves adjust to the highest number within the range will result in an audible ticking sound when the engine is started.
  • The drive shaft of the water pump wears out because of a mechanical seal failing.
  • The engine releases gas into the overflow tube as a result of insufficient float height setting or worn needle valves for floats.
  • OEM ECU results in the battery draining in many units.
  • The brake light on the master’s cylinder in front is cut out, causing that fuse’s main to explode.
  • The sensor for the roll-over is not functional and is better left unattended (a Tipp-Over Eliminator is able to do the trick).
  • The header cracks, then blow out because of heat and vibration.
  • The bolts that hold the rear sprocket are sheared which causes chain burst.
  • The electrical system isn’t easy to diagnose.
  • Bolts for draining oil come off easily.

While some of the issues might be caused by an assembly issue at the dealership, many results from improper maintenance and use (and the abuse) of the four-wheeler. 

The exposure of your four-wheeler to elements that are not protected or not taking the appropriate steps prior to taking it to storage for long durations can just cause more damage than good.

In the same way, forcing your vehicle to transform into an endurance racer by making modifications that aren’t intuitive just exacerbates the issues it already has.

About Kawasaki

Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. is a Japanese firm that is known for its high-quality vehicles that are competitive with the competition, like Kawasaki KFX 700. 

Established in 1878, Kawasaki is traced back to its humble beginnings as a supplier of parts to shipping firms before expanding into a variety of industries related to automobiles.

This renowned business has grown to multi-million-dollar manufacturing of aerospace, transit as well as energy-related systems.

They also manufacture hydraulic machines motorsport vehicles Side x sides and watercraft.

Conclusion Final Kawasaki KFX 700 review

Overall All in all, the Kawasaki KFX 700 is not a disappointment. Similar to other models before it, the KFX 700 features the same massive power supply with low-range torque, a well-built frame, as well as other highly sought-after mechanisms that have spawned the current big-bore monsters.

It’s got elements that might seem a bit restrictive to the more experienced rider. 

However, with well-planned modifications, the most experienced off-roader will surely enjoy the many advantages this legendary four-wheeler offers.

2006 Kawasaki KFX700

Year 2006
Model: KFX
Torque @ RPM: 59
Price: 6,499
Make: Kawasaki
Horsepower @ RPM: [email protected]
Displacement: 697 L

Engine

Engine Type 4-Stroke SOHC
Cylinder Arrangement V-Twin, 90° cylinder offset
Carburetion System Carburetor, Keihin CVKR–D32 x 2
Engine Cooling Liquid cooling
Fuel Capacity 12 L/3.2 US gal
Bore x Stroke Ratio 3.23 × 2.6 in
Compression Ratio 9.9:1
Starting System Electric
Displacement 697 cm³ / 42.5 in³
Maximum Power 48.7 hp/49.4 PS (36.3 kW) @ 6,500 RPM
Maximum Torque 59.2 Nm (6.04 kgf-m, 43.67 ft-lb) @ 5,000 RPM
Top Speed 76.4 mph (123 km/h) – owners’ claim
Air Filtration High-quality foam element

Drivetrain

Clutch Wet, multi-plate type
Transmission Type 1-speed and reverse
Drive System (Cardan) Shaft 2WD, (Kevlar) Belt drive torque converter
Primary Ratio 3.122 – 0.635
Final Drive Ratio 4.375 (35/8)
Transmission Gear Ratio Forward – 2.416 (29/27 × 27/20 × 20/12)
Reverse – 4.285 (16/12 × 20/14 × 27/20 × 20/12)

Ignition

Ignition Digital DC-CDI (Capacitor Discharge Ignition), electronically advanced
Ignition Timing 5° BTDC @ 1,100 RPM to 28° BTDC @ 5,000 RPM
Spark Plug, Gap NGK CR7E, DENSO U22ESR-N, gap (0.7-0.8 mm, 0.028-0.031 in)
Alternator Type Triple-phase A.C. generator
Rated Output 25 A, 14V @ 6,000 RPM
Fuse 30 Amp
Battery 12V (14 Ah), YTX14-BS formats (view on Amazon)
Battery Dimensions (L x W x H) 150 x 87 x 145 mm (6 x 3.44 x 5.75 in)

Tires & Brakes

Front Rim Size 10 x 5.5
Rear Rim Size 10 x 8.5
Front Tire, off-road/road air pressure Tubeless, Carlisle Holeshot XC AT22 x 7-10, 27.58 kPa (0.28 kg/cm2, 4 psi)
Rear Tire, off-road/road air pressure Tubeless, Carlisle Holeshot XCT AT22 x 11-10, 34.57 kPa (0.35 kg/cm2, 5 psi)
Front Brake Type Dual hydraulic discs w/ twin-piston calipers
Rear Brake Type Enclosed wet multi-plate

Suspension

Frame Type High-tensile tubular steel, double-cradle
Caster, Trail 4.5°, 20 mm (0.79 in)
Turning Radius 3.2 m (10.5 ft)
Front Suspension Type, Travel Double A-arms w/ coil-over shocks (5-way adjustable preload), 236 mm (9.29 in)

Exterior

Indicator Lamps Standard
Fuel Gauge Standard
Engine Stop Switch Standard
Headlight Semi-sealed beam, 12V 45W/45W x 2
Brake Light/Taillight 12V 21W/5W

Are KFX 700 any good?

Trail Machine

Comparatively, with the Brute Force, it is a bit more expensive. KFX 700 offers a firmer out-saddle riding experience and less body roll due to its double A-arm suspension in the front. Although this model is ideal for drag races, it’s not suitable for MX tracks because of the weight.

What is the biggest ATV Kawasaki?

OVERVIEW. It is powered by a fuel-injected 749cc V-twin engine that produces massive power. This Brute Force(r) 4x4i ATV 750 provides top-quality performance for outdoor pursuits. With a towing capacity of 1,250 pounds and an independent suspension, the ATV is suitable for 16 years old or older.

Is Kawasaki a good ATV brand?

Kawasaki bicycles are trustworthy in each way. The ATV brand produces one of the most durable quad bikes and markets worldwide. Their reliability is dependent on many aspects, and as time passes, the quad’s performance decreases.

What is the most reliable ATV?

Honda

Based on the votes of consumers at ATV.com, Honda is the most trusted ATV brand. The second spot in the polls is Yamaha.

How fast can a ATV go?

Q How fast can ATVs travel? The latest and most potent ATVs for utility and sports have maximum speeds of around 80mph (128km/h). The average rate for moderately sized bikes is about 65mph (104km/h). Youth ATVs come with limiters for speed to allow the parent to decide how fast the bike can travel.

Is Kawasaki a good ATV brand?

Kawasaki bicycles are safe in every way. The ATV brand produces the best quality quad bikes and distributes them worldwide. Their reliability is dependent on many aspects, and as time passes, the quad’s reliability decreases.

What is the most reliable ATV brand?

Honda

According to consumer polls on ATV.com, Honda is the most trusted ATV brand. Second place in the elections is Yamaha.

What is low mileage for an ATV?

When considering the used 4 wheelers available to buy, most people think 5000 miles are “high mileage,” whereas any distance of up 1,000 miles is generally considered “low mileage.” The number of miles a quad or SxS is driven for doesn’t paint the complete picture, and therefore it is essential to be aware of the duration of use, maintenance and hours …

What oil should I use in my ATV?

Synthetic oil is typically the ideal option to use on your ATV. Regularly riding the synthetic oil will enable your ATV to run at its best. Synthetic oil is more resistant to higher temperatures and remains longer and cleaner. It can help you avoid changing your engine every so often when you ride several times per week.

Are Kawasaki Brute Force 750 good?

The power that comes out of corners is fantastic. However, you’ll have to be cautious entering the corners because there are rear brakes, which are a bit soft. Its Brute Force 750 4x4i is an absolute blast to ride and certainly blurs the lines between utility and sport. It was an excellent performance!

What does the i stand for in brute force 750i?

It is believed that the “EPS” on Brute Force ATV’s name is Electronic Power Steering. The letters 650/750 mean that it has a solid rear axle. I/IRS = Indepentand Rear Suspension.

How many brands of ATVs are there?

It is possible to find 9 major manufacturers of four-wheelers produced for sale in the United States. Each of these nine companies makes a variety of designs of four-wheelers. However, typically, they’re a single frame that can be found in various styles of suspension, engine, and accessory configurations.

Kawasaki KFX 700 FAQ

1. What’s the fastest four-wheeler?

The record for the world’s fastest speed of an ATV was set on the 28th of August year 2008 by Terry Wilmeth of Oregon. He clocked his highest velocity at 196.19 miles/hour. He was riding the Yamaha 700 Raptor which was modified by an engine that was a hybrid of a rocket thruster.

2. What was the last year of the kfx450?

Kawasaki KFX450R 2014. Kawasaki KFX450R is thoughtfully developed to offer top-quality performance and control to match any beast off-road.

3. How fast does a 700cc ATV go?

With a maximum speed this fast it will be able to reach the speed limit in the range of forty to fifty miles per hour frequently on trails. The 700cc displacement of this ATV will generate a lot of power. If speed is your goal it will provide the speed you want… in the minimum until you reach the built-in rev limiter of approximately 75 MPH.

4. What’s faster than a raptor 700?

The larger the engine, the more powerful the quad typically. However, the engine’s type is important also. For instance, the LT500 Quadzilla was made in 1988 and is currently among the list of the fastest ten. Because of its 500cc 2-stroke engine, it is able to reach speeds faster than that of the Raptor 700 which is a four-stroke.

5. How much HP does a Raptor 700?

The SOHC, 686cc, YFI (Yamaha Fuel Injection), 44mm throttle-body-injected, the big-bore engine produces approximately 45 horsepower to the crank. However, torque is an even more significant aspect than horsepower. A piston that is forged and lightweight as well as a connecting rod and crankshaft is strong and light.

6. What’s the difference between the Raptor 700 and 700R?

In tackling trails and dunes effortlessly With ease, the Raptor 700 range offers top design, comfort, and unbeatable performance for big bores, which makes it one of the most thrilling sport ATV for those who love thrills and weekend racers.  The suspension on Raptor 700R models is upgraded with low and high-speed compression and rebound adjustment.

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